Learn more about invasive species in webinar series

Learn more about invasive species in webinar series

 
Jan. 19, 2022
Contact: Joanne Foreman, 517-284-5814

Learn more about invasive species in 2022 by joining webinar series

If understanding invasive species and their impacts on the environment is on your to-do list this year, Michigan’s free NotMISpecies webinar series makes it easy to accomplish. One information-packed hour each month can provide insights into the people, technologies and programs at work across the state to identify, prevent and control invasive species.

Tuning into live events provides the opportunity to get answers to your questions from experts in the field. If you have a busy schedule, previous NotMISpecies webinars are available for viewing on your own time. Recorded versions are available at Michigan.gov/EGLEEvents under “Featured Webinar Series.”

Register for these upcoming sessions by following the link in each webinar title.

eDNA sampleWelcome in the new year with a “Dive into the Gene Pool” (9 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 25), where we will examine the emerging use of environmental DNA to detect invasive carp and other aquatic invasive species in the Great Lakes and connecting waters. Join Nick Frohnauer of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Kim Scribner and John Robinson from Michigan State University as they share how it works, when and where this tool is most effective, and what’s on the horizon for eDNA in Michigan’s invasive species detection efforts.
A bag of live red swamp crayfish“The AIS-Team” (9 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 16) explores conservation officers’ role in preventing invasive species introductions. Join Cpl. Nick Torsky of the Department of Natural Resources Law Enforcement Division’s Great Lakes Enforcement Unit to learn about enforcing boating and bait-related regulations, oversight of Michigan’s organisms-in-trade, interagency cooperation across the Great Lakes basin and some recent investigations that highlight the DNR’s enforcement efforts.

Michigan’s Invasive Species Program, a collaborative effort of the departments of Natural Resources; Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy; and Agriculture and Rural Development, coordinates and supports invasive species initiatives across the state and provides support through the Michigan Invasive Species Grant Program.


/Note to editors: Accompanying photos are available below for download. Caption information follows.
eDNA sampling: The Michigan DNR collaborates annually with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to sample high-priority locations for the presence of bighead and silver carp genetic material. Photo courtesy of USFWS.

RSC import: Live red swamp crayfish, a prohibited species in Michigan, intercepted by DNR Law Enforcement Division. Photo courtesy of Michigan DNR./

DNR News: Additional angling opportunities

DNR News: Additional angling opportunities

Michigan DNR banner

– DNR News –

Jan. 18, 2022
Contact: Ed Eisch, 231-499-4118 or Sierra Williams, 517-230-8788

Additional angling opportunities created by successful fall fish stocking season

Stocking brook trout at Lost Lake Eight different species, 672,478 fish, weighing in at nearly 13.5 tons – those are the totals from the Michigan Department of Natural Resources’ fall 2021 fish stocking efforts at 123 locations across the state.

“It was another outstanding fall fish stocking season that will provide enhanced opportunities throughout Michigan,” said Ed Eisch, DNR fish production manager. “When added to our successful spring and summer stocking efforts, that brings the total for 2021 to more than 18.2 million fish put into Michigan’s waters.”

The number and type of fish stocked vary by hatchery, as each facility’s ability to rear fish differs because of water supplies and temperature. In Michigan, there are six state and three cooperative hatcheries that work together to produce the species, strain and size of fish needed by fisheries managers. These fish must then be delivered at a specific time and location for stocking to ensure their success. Most fish in Michigan are stocked in the spring.

Fall fish stockings in 2021 consisted of eight species that included: brook trout, brown trout, channel catfish, coho salmon, lake trout, Eagle Lake and steelhead strain rainbow trout, walleye and muskellunge.

  • Marquette State Fish Hatchery (near Marquette) stocked 38,003 fall fingerling and adult brook and lake trout that weighed a combined 8,018 pounds. These fish were stocked at 46 locations, both in the Upper and Lower peninsulas.
  • Oden State Fish Hatchery (near Petoskey) stocked 37,000 Wild Rose brown trout and 113,863 Eagle Lake rainbow trout fall fingerlings that weighed a combined 4,093 pounds. These fish were stocked at four locations.
  • Platte River State Fish Hatchery (west of Traverse City) stocked 70,194 fall fingerling coho salmon weighing 2,999 pounds. These salmon were stocked in the East Branch of the AuGres River located in Iosco County.
  • Thompson State Fish Hatchery (near Manistique) stocked 349,213 fall fingerling steelhead that weighed 3,810 pounds at four locations. In addition, the first year of musky production was a success at Thompson, stocking 20,037 fish at 12 locations.
  • Wolf Lake State Fish Hatchery (west of Kalamazoo) stocked 9,850 Great Lakes strain muskellunge fall fingerlings that weighed 1,083 pounds and were stocked at 13 locations.
  • Several fisheries management units (Northern Lake Michigan, Southern Lake Michigan, Central Lake Michigan, Lake Erie and Southern Lake Huron) also stocked fall fingerling walleyes in 2021. The Northern Lake Michigan management unit stocked 4,927 Bay De Noc strain fall fingerlings weighing 730 pounds, while the Lake Erie and Southern and Central Lake Michigan management units stocked 23,133 Muskegon strain fall fingerlings weighing 2,108 pounds.
  • Three sites were stocked with a total of 5,035 channel catfish from Ohio, with a total weight of 1,014 pounds. These fish were part of an annual agreement that includes Michigan providing Ohio with steelhead eggs in exchange for fall fingerling channel catfish.
  • Also as part of an annual cooperative exchange, 2,123 Northern strain muskellunge from the Wisconsin DNR weighing 685 pounds were stocked at four locations in both the Upper and Lower peninsulas. The Michigan DNR provided Wisconsin with Great Lakes strain muskies in exchange for these fish.

In general, fish are reared in Michigan’s state fish hatcheries anywhere from one month to one and a half years before they are stocked.

The DNR welcomes visitors to its state fish hatcheries and interpretative centers to witness firsthand the fish rearing process and to learn about Michigan’s waters. For more information, visit Michigan.gov/Hatcheries. For everyone’s safety, masks are recommended for all visitors entering public buildings.

To find out if any fish were stocked in your favorite fishing spot, visit the DNR’s fish stocking database at MichiganDNR.com/FishStock/.


Note to editors: An accompanying photo is available below for download. Caption information follows.

  • Stocking: Brook trout were planted in Lost Lake, Keweenaw County, in November 2021 as part of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources’ fall fish stocking effort.
DNR COVID-19 RESPONSE: For details on affected DNR facilities and services, visit this webpage. Follow state actions and guidelines at Michigan.gov/Coronavirus.
The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state’s natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to Michigan.gov/DNR.
DNR offers variety of sponsorship opportunities

DNR offers variety of sponsorship opportunities

Michigan DNR banner

– DNR News –

Jan. 13, 2022

Contact: Kristin Phillips, 517-284-6065

DNR offers variety of sponsorship and partnership opportunities

Man, woman and two young boys look at black bear exhibitThe Michigan Department of Natural Resources invites businesses and organizations to get involved as sponsors and partners in taking care of the state’s natural and cultural resources, while connecting with the millions of people who enjoy them.

With less than 15% of the DNR’s annual budget coming from general tax dollars, new and creative revenue sources are vital to fulfilling the department’s mission.

“We are open to a variety of sponsorships and partnerships to help people enjoy and appreciate Michigan’s natural and cultural resources and, at the same time, highlight the many businesses that are growing the outdoor recreation industry and the state’s economy,” said Kristin Phillips, DNR Marketing and Outreach Division chief.

Examples of sponsorship/partnership opportunities include:

  • Advertising in the annual hunting digest or fishing guide, reaching hundreds of thousands of Michigan hunters or over 1 million anglers. Find more information about advertising opportunities at Michigan.gov/DNRDigests.
  • Joining the “These Goods are Good for Michigan” program. This collection of partners works with the DNR to raise awareness and support through revenue sharing – on products or services of interest to outdoor enthusiasts – for state parks, trails, waterways, and fish and wildlife species restoration. If you’re interested in becoming a partner, contact Maia Turek at 989-225-8573.
  • Expanding visitor services and experiences throughout the DNR parks and recreation system by becoming a concessionaire. The department’s “outdoorpreneur” partners include concessions, restaurants, gift shops, rental outfitters, water park operators, guide services and many others. Find current concession opportunities at Michigan.gov/StateParkConcessions or contact Lori Green at 989-889-9178, for more information.
  • Bringing “up north” to downtown Detroit with sponsorship opportunities at the Outdoor Adventure Center, from exhibit and display sponsors to naming rights on the building. Those interested in promoting stewardship and enjoyment of Michigan’s natural resources have the chance to inspire millions annually through this hands-on, urban educational facility.
  • Contributing to DNR visitor centers, which host nature exhibits and programs that help teach thousands of schoolchildren and families more about Michigan’s natural resources. For more information about exhibit and building sponsorship opportunities at Saginaw Bay Visitor Center in Bay City, Carl T. Johnson Hunting and Fishing Center in Cadillac and Wolf Lake State Fish Hatchery Visitor Center in Mattawan, contact Jon Spieles at 906-293-5131, ext. 4023.
  • Sponsoring habitat projects on state-managed lands through the Adopt-a-Game-Area program and help grassland wildlife thrive. Support of this program provides valuable habitat for a wide range of wildlife, including deer, turkeys, pheasants, ducks, cottontail rabbits, songbirds and pollinators.
  • Becoming a partner in the Iron Belle Trail Fund Campaign, which aims to create a seamless, 2,000-mile trail – with two distinct routes, one for bicycling and one for hiking – that connects Michigan from Belle Isle in Detroit to Ironwood in the western Upper Peninsula.

Businesses and organizations interested in these, or other, opportunities can contact Kristin Phillips at 517-284-6065 to discuss.

For a complete list of ongoing sponsorship and partnership options, bookmark the DNR Get Involved webpage, where new opportunities will be added as they become available.


Note to editors: An accompanying photo is available below for download. Caption information follows.

  • Visitors: The Michigan Department of Natural Resources offers many ways businesses and organizations can get involved as sponsors and partners in taking care of the state’s natural and cultural resources, while connecting with the millions of people who enjoy them. One example is contributing to DNR visitor centers, which host nature exhibits and programs that reach thousands of schoolchildren and families.
DNR COVID-19 RESPONSE: For details on affected DNR facilities and services, visit this webpage. Follow state actions and guidelines at Michigan.gov/Coronavirus.
The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state’s natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to Michigan.gov/DNR.
DNR: Artists sought for Artist-in-Residence program

DNR: Artists sought for Artist-in-Residence program

 
Michigan DNR banner

– Upper Peninsula DNR News –

Jan. 12, 2022
Contact: John Pepin (Media), 906-226-1352

Artists sought for Artist-in-Residence program at Porcupine Mountains

A wintry view of the Carp River valley is shown at the Porcupine Mountains.Applications are now being accepted for the Porcupine Mountains Artist-in-Residence Program for 2022 spring, summer and fall and winter 2022-2023 residencies.

The program is open to artists and artisans whose work can be influenced by the unique northern wilderness setting of Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park – also known as “the Porkies.”

Located in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, the park encompasses 25 miles of wave-washed shores, four inland lakes, entire river systems, countless waterfalls, enchanting wooded peaks and an escarpment that rises slowly from the edge of Lake Superior until it plummets abruptly into the Carp River valley.

Still, the park’s most impressive feature – and the reason for its creation – is its virgin forest of eastern hemlock and northern hardwoods and the variety of flora and fauna that it supports. Because of these attributes, the park is an ideal location to inspire creativity.

The Artist-in-Residence Program offers writers, composers and all visual and performing artists an opportunity to experience the natural beauty of the Porkies and to express it through their art form.

Each year, artists are selected for residencies lasting a minimum of two weeks. They are given the use of a rustic cabin located on the Little Union River and, if requested, a three-night backcountry permit so that each may live in and explore the park’s 60,000 acres of natural beauty, ranging from stunning vistas to 90 miles of rugged backcountry trails.

The program is open to all art forms except those that may be inconsistent with the mission of the park. Selection is based on artistic integrity, ability to reside in a wilderness environment, the artist’s ability to relate to and interpret the park through their art medium and a willingness to donate an original, finished piece of art inspired by their stay in the Porkies. Artists will also be asked to share their experiences with the public through a demonstration or talk during their residencies.

Application materials for the Porcupine Mountains Artist-in-Residence Program can be found at the Friends of the Porkies webpage at Porkies.org/Artist-in-Residence. Applications for the 2022-2023 season must be received by Feb. 14, 2022. Selected artists will be notified by phone in mid-April, and by will be posted by April 22 on the Friends webpage and on Facebook at Friends of the Porkies.


Note to editors: An accompanying photo is available below for download. Caption information follows. Credit: Michigan Department of Natural Resources.

Valley: A wintry view of the Carp River valley is shown at Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park.

DNR COVID-19 RESPONSE: For details on affected DNR facilities and services, visit this webpage. Follow state actions and guidelines at Michigan.gov/Coronavirus.
The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state’s natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to Michigan.gov/DNR.
DNR News Digest – Week of Jan. 10, 2022

DNR News Digest – Week of Jan. 10, 2022

 

Michigan DNR banner

News Digest – Week of Jan. 10, 2022

back view of three people cross-country skiing down a snow-covered, lantern-lit trail

Looking for lantern-lit skiing or snowshoeing? Check out Michigan.gov/DNRCalendar.

This week’s stories may reflect how the Department of Natural Resources has adapted to meet customer needs and protect public health and safety. Follow our COVID-19 response page for updates on access to facilities and programs.

We’ll continue to share news and information about the best ways to discover and enjoy Michigan’s natural and heritage resources! Here’s a look at some of this week’s stories:

See other news releases, Showcasing the DNR stories, photos and other resources at Michigan.gov/DNRPressRoom.

PHOTO FOLDER: Larger, higher-res versions of the images used below, and others, are available in this folder. Accompanying caption info follows:

Christmas ornament on tree: Not sure what to do with holiday wreaths and trees? There are good options that don’t involve putting them in the trash. (Photo courtesy Pixabay.) Elk in Pigeon River: The recent elk hunting season update is on the Jan. 13 Michigan Natural Resources Commission meeting agendaSeasonal ranger and seasonal worker – Belle Isle: The DNR is hiring for both of these positions for spring, summer and fall.


Photo ambassador snapshot: Grand Haven’s icy grandeur

aerial view of the iced-in pier around the Grand Haven LighthouseWant to see more pictures like this, taken by Michigan state parks photo ambassador Joel Marotti at Grand Haven State Park in Ottawa County? Visit Instagram.com/MiStateParks to explore photos and learn more about the photo ambassadors! For more on the photo ambassador program, call Stephanie Yancer at 989-274-6182.


Natural Resources Commission to meet Thursday in Lansing

A bull elk is shown from the Pigeon River Country in the northern Lower Peninsula.An update on the state forest roads inventory, presentation of the American Legion Award, an overview of elk hunting season results and several land transactions are just some of the agenda items for the next meeting of the Michigan Natural Resources Commission, scheduled for Thursday, Jan. 13.

The meeting will start at 9 a.m. in the Forum at the Michigan Library and Historical Center, 702 W. Kalamazoo St., in downtown Lansing. For everyone’s safety, masks are recommended for all visitors.

See the meeting’s full draft agenda at Michigan.gov/NRC. For more information or to request time to speak at the meeting, contact Victoria Lischalk at 517-599-1067 or NRC@Michigan.gov.


Un-decking the halls? What to do with holiday wreaths, trees

a shiny, round red and gold ornament hangs on Christmas tree, close-up viewAs you pack up holiday décor while munching on a dwindling stash of sugar cookies, you might wonder if there’s an alternative to cramming decorations like live wreaths, garlands or Christmas trees into the trash can.

An easy option is to break up foliage and add it to a compost pile where it will mix with other organic material like coffee grounds and kitchen scraps, eventually decomposing and enriching the soil. View composting tips from the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy to get started.

Bag and dispose of any real berries and bits of floral arrangements crafted from non-native plants in the trash.

If you have space, scattering branches near a woodland edge in your backyard is another option, which will create brushy cover that cottontail rabbits will love to hide in. Squirrels, foxes, chipmunks and birds like wrens and cardinals also appreciate brush. You can do this on your own property, but don’t dispose of trees on public lands or waterways. Keep in mind, too, that providing habitat for small mammals could lead to visitors such as coyotes, hawks and owls.

Before placing foliage in the outdoors, make sure there are no ribbons, wires, fake berries or bits of tinsel still attached.

“Wires and ornament hooks could entangle wildlife, and fake berries could be swallowed if mistaken for the real thing,” said DNR wildlife outreach coordinator Rachel Leightner.

Dry conifers can be flammable, so spread foliage out in pieces instead of placing it in one big pile if you have a lot of material.

No space to compost a tree outside, or your local ordinances don’t allow it? See if there is a curbside pickup program or community compost drop-off site near you. With a woodchipper, you also can turn a holiday tree into garden mulch.

If you happened to hang mistletoe (the “kissing plant”) this season, kiss it goodbye by tossing it in the trash, not the woods. Some varieties of this parasitic plant are invasive.

Questions? Contact Rachel Coale, DNR Forest Resources Division, at 517-930-1283.


Hiring seasonal park positions for spring, summer and fall

thumbnail play button image from DNR video about hiring seasonal park workers, showing a worker helping a customer at park entranceWhether you want to spend more time in some of Michigan’s most beautiful destinations, keep busy in retirement or lay the foundation for a career in natural resources, one of hundreds of positions as a seasonal park worker or ranger with the DNR Parks and Recreation Division may be right for you.

Watch this brief video to hear from past and current seasonal park workers about what they gained from these opportunities.

There are approximately 1,300 seasonal park worker positions available in state parks, state forest campgrounds, boating access sites and harbors. These frontline staff help answer visitor questions, register campers, clean park buildings, mow grass, maintain trails and more. The positions start at an hourly rate of $10.20 or $11 (depending on region) and offer flexible scheduling (up to 1,040 hours between April and October) and may qualify for academic or internship credit.

More than 50 seasonal park rangers also will be hired throughout the state. A park ranger helps carry out day-to-day operations and maintenance and other essential duties. Positions are paid between $18.29 and $25.70 an hour and receive state employment benefits.

a young woman with dark hair, her arms leaned on the window sill, smiles from inside the welcome window at Belle IsleTo apply, visit Michigan.gov/DNRJobs:

  • Seasonal park worker positions: Should be 18 or older and have a high school diploma or equivalent. Provide your name, email, phone number and desired work location(s) on the interest form. Applying should take less than five minutes. Interested applicants also can text “Hire” to 80888 and receive a link to the interest form.
  • Seasonal park ranger positions: Must be 18 or older and have a high school diploma or equivalent. Complete a State of Michigan employment application.

“If you love Michigan’s great outdoors and are looking for a seasonal position with flexible hours, come work where you like to spend time the most,” said Michael Desnoyer, administrative services chief for the DNR Parks and Recreation Division. “These positions are also ideal for college students, teachers and retirees.”

Learn more about these and other openings at Michigan.gov/DNRJobs. Questions? Contact Michael Desnoyer at 517-242-2194.


Watch this season’s first episode of ‘Wardens’ for free online

A male, uniformed DNR conservation officer, wearing a ballcap and holding binoculars, looks off in the distance, outdoorsEver wonder what it’s like to do the job of a Michigan conservation officer? Get a close-up look during this season’s opening episode of “Wardens” – the Outdoor Channel television show featuring the work of COs and other DNR professionals including wildlife biologists, foresters, fisheries technicians, park rangers and many others.

The season’s first episode will be available at no charge throughout January. Highlights include conservation officers tracking down trespassers and volunteers helping to support a pheasant hunt for military veterans and first responders.

Episodes air on the Outdoor Channel every Monday at 5:30 p.m. and then are repeated Monday at 2:30 a.m., Tuesday at 7:30 a.m., Friday at 8:30 and 11:30 p.m. and Saturday at 5:30 p.m. (All times Eastern Standard).

To get the Outdoor Channel, ask your local TV service provider or Amazon Prime, or go to OutdoorChannel.com or MyOutdoorTV.com or call 1-855-44OUTDOOR. More than 52 episodes of “Wardens” have featured the state of Michigan.

Questions? Contact Dave Haupt at 517-420-0819.


THINGS TO DO

New year, new adventure! Challenge yourself and learn about ice fishing, bringing in the birds, snowshoe building and more; sign up for an Outdoor Skills Academy class.

BUY & APPLY

It’s not too early to think about summer vacation planning, so if your plans include time at Michigan’s beautiful state park campgrounds and harbors, book your spot today.

GET INVOLVED

Want to share your expertise and experience with new hunters, boaters, snowmobilers and ORV riders? Become a volunteer recreational safety instructor this year.

DNR News: 2022 Black Lake sturgeon season

DNR News: 2022 Black Lake sturgeon season

Michigan DNR banner

– DNR News –

Jan. 10, 2022
Contact: Tim Cwalinski, 231-340-0276 or Sierra Williams, 517-230-8788

2022 Black Lake sturgeon season begins Feb. 5

SturgeonMichigan’s 2022 lake sturgeon fishing season on Black Lake in Cheboygan County will begin at 8 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 5. All anglers must register online by Feb. 4 to participate in the fishing season.

The harvest limit for the 2022 season on Black Lake is six lake sturgeon. To prevent overfishing, Department of Natural Resources officials will close the season when one of two scenarios occurs:

  1. The sixth fish is harvested.
  2. Five fish have been harvested at the end of any fishing day.

Fishing hours are 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. each day of the season. The season will end either at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 9, or when one of the above scenarios is met, at which point anglers will be notified via text message and on the ice by DNR personnel that they must immediately stop fishing for lake sturgeon.

Anglers must register for the season, and those 17 or older must have a valid Michigan fishing license. This year, anglers must register online by Feb. 4 to participate. Get more registration information at Michigan.gov/Sturgeon.

Participating anglers must bring their own 1-foot-diameter or larger bright red flag to hang on their fishing shanty to help DNR personnel identify those who are sturgeon fishing. Anglers are asked to hang one or more of these in highly visible locations on their shanty.

Anyone harvesting a lake sturgeon must immediately contact DNR personnel on the ice to register the fish. Official registration of harvested fish will be at the Onaway DNR Field Office 1 mile south of Onaway State Park. Harvest registration may include an examination of internal organs and removal of a piece of fin tissue for DNA analysis or aging.

Lake sturgeon rehabilitation efforts in Black Lake over the last two decades have been a successful collaborative effort between the Michigan DNR, Sturgeon for Tomorrow, tribal agencies, Michigan State University and Tower-Kleber Limited Partnership. This population has increased in the past 20 years due to rearing and stocking efforts, research, and protection of spawning adults, and this trend is expected to continue.

Anglers should be aware of marginal ice conditions on regional lakes so far this year and use extreme caution if fishing. Visit Michigan.gov/IceSafety for tips to stay safe on the ice.


DNR COVID-19 RESPONSE: For details on affected DNR facilities and services, visit this webpage. Follow state actions and guidelines at Michigan.gov/Coronavirus.
The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state’s natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to Michigan.gov/DNR.