$1.73 million in EGLE brownfield funding

$1.73 million in EGLE brownfield funding

 
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Nov. 7, 2022
Jill A. Greenberg, EGLE spokesperson, GreenbergJ@Michigan.gov, 517-897-4965
EGLE Media Office, EGLE-assist@Michigan.gov, 517-284-9278

$1.73 million in EGLE brownfield funding to help redevelop contaminated sites in West Michigan

The Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE) has awarded $1.73 million in brownfield grants for redevelopment of contaminated properties in West Michigan. Overall, in 2022 EGLE will provide $20.7 million in brownfield funding to 67 projects statewide.

The plans include a multi-phased mixed-use development within the Boston Square Neighborhood of Grand Rapids, commercial condominiums in Grand Haven and a residential development in Grand Rapids.

More than half of EGLE’s budget each year flows into Michigan communities through grants, loans and other spending that supports local projects, protects public health and the environment, ultimately creating economic growth and jobs for Michigan workers. When brownfields – vacant or abandoned properties with known or suspected contamination – are redeveloped, property values increase both on the revitalized site awards and on other nearby properties.

EGLE’s Remediation and Redevelopment Division provides financial and technical assistance including grants, loans, tax increment financing and free site assessments to facilitate the redevelopment of brownfield properties.

Boston Square Neighborhood in Grand Rapids

The city of Grand Rapids Brownfield Redevelopment Authority plans to use a $1 million EGLE brownfield grant to address environmental contamination in the Boston Square Neighborhood in Grand Rapids, and make way for a multi-phase, mixed-use development that was collaboratively designed with neighbors. The community-focused development will begin with the construction of two mixed-use buildings, which will contain 102 mixed-income residential apartments and 16,000-square-feet of commercial space for local entrepreneurs. Future phases of the development are anticipated to include additional mixed-income residential apartments and townhomes, commercial spaces for local entrepreneurs, a community hub with early learning, an amphitheater, and a public park.

“The City of Grand Rapids Brownfield Redevelopment Authority is grateful to receive this grant from EGLE for the Boston Square Together project,” said Jonathan Klooster, executive director of the city of Grand Rapids Brownfield Redevelopment Authority. “EGLE has come alongside our existing community partnership with Boston Square Neighborhood Association, Oakdale Neighbors and Amplify GR and this award puts us one step closer to kicking off a significant part of the overall project.”

The contamination on the site is believed to be a remnant of historical property uses, which included gasoline service stations, various auto service, repair and sales operations, and numerous other commercial and light manufacturing operations. Contamination also resulted from both the placement of urban fill on the property and the former presence of railroad spurs.

The EGLE grant will pay for demolition, environmental investigation, disposal of contaminated soil, and installation of barriers and  ventilation systems beneath the future buildings to prevent potential exposure to residual contamination.

“Through our partnership with EGLE and the city of Grand Rapids, the Boston Square Together project can ensure the landscape is clean and healthy for current and future generations of neighbors,” shared Jon Ippel, executive director at Amplify GR. “We are appreciative of the collaboration that affirms neighbors’ desires to one day achieve environmental justice.”

The city of Grand Rapids has also approved several other brownfield incentives to help pay for other environmental costs, and site and public improvements. Once complete, the project is expected to create at least 24 part-time jobs and 24 full-time jobs, increase the City’s tax base, and revitalize over 10 acres of property in an area that has suffered decades of disinvestment.

(EGLE site contact: Andrea Ryswick, Brownfield Coordinator, RyswickA@Michigan.gov, 616-401-0827)

815 Verhoeks Street in Grand Haven

Three new, five-unit commercial condominiums will be constructed at 815 Verhoeks Street in Grand Haven after the site’s environmental contamination is addressed with assistance from a $300,000 EGLE brownfield grant. The redevelopment will encompass 16,000 square feet, providing space for local artisans, small incubator businesses and private storage.

The property historically operated as a gasoline filling station and bulk oil storage facility. The contamination at the property is the result of leaking fuel from storage tanks associated with a former site use.

EGLE awarded the Grand Haven Brownfield Redevelopment Authority (GHBRA) the grant to help facilitate the redevelopment and ensure the property is safe for reuse. The funding will be used for additional environmental investigation, disposal of contaminated soil, and installation of barriers and ventilation systems beneath the future buildings to prevent potential exposure to any residual contamination.

“For decades we have looked at a dilapidated building and have worried about groundwater contamination from this orphan site. Now we will see a redeveloped, prosperous property returning value to the community,” said Joy Gaasch, president of the GHBRA. “This would have been impossible without the support of the EGLE brownfield grant funding.”

Once complete, the project is expected to create five-to-seven full-time and 20 part-time jobs, increase the city’s tax base and encourage investment in the surrounding properties.

(EGLE site contact: Douglas Koop, Brownfield Coordinator,KoopD@Michigan.gov, 517-245-5054)

1603 Diamond Avenue NE in Grand Rapids

Metric Structures Inc. will construct a new multi-building residential development at 1603 Diamond Avenue NE and 1600 County Club Drive NE in Grand Rapids after environmental contamination is addressed through assistance from a $430,000 EGLE brownfield grant.

Historically, 1603 Diamond Avenue NE operated as a gas station, which resulted in soil and groundwater contamination.

In 2018, as part of a state-funded effort to remove the contaminated soil, approximately 2,655 tons of soil was removed. At that time, it was found that contamination likely extended beneath the onsite building, but it was unable to be removed without compromising the structure. New property ownership has resulted in a plan to revitalize the space into a vibrant new residential development. The development will require the demolition of the existing building, allowing for the removal of contaminated soils that were previously inaccessible.

EGLE awarded the grant to the city of Grand Rapids Economic Development Corporation to help facilitate the redevelopment and ensure the property is safe for reuse. The grant will be used for demolition of the building, environmental investigations, removal of contaminated soil, and installation of barriers and ventilation systems beneath the future buildings to prevent potential exposure to any residual contamination.

“The City of Grand Rapids Economic Development Corporation is grateful to EGLE for their investment in the cleanup efforts of this project,” said Jonathan Klooster, executive director for the city of Grand Rapids Economic Development Corporation. “Our partnership continues to make urban infill projects like this financially feasible and helps to incrementally increase housing supply in our community.”

Once complete, the $8 million project is expected to remove blight, create one new part-time job and increase the State Equalized Value of the property by approximately $5.8 million.

(EGLE site contact: Andrea Ryswick, Brownfield Coordinator, RyswickA@Michigan.gov, 616-401-0827)

EGLE celebrates 50 years of the Clean Water Act

EGLE celebrates 50 years of the Clean Water Act

EGLE Main GovD banner
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Sept. 30, 2022
Jeff Johnston, EGLE public information officer, JohnstonJ14@Michigan.gov, 517-231-9304

EGLE celebrates 50 years of the Clean Water Act

Webinar series marks a half century of landmark federal protection for waterways

CWA50-Logo-not-transparentThe federal Clean Water Act (CWA) took effect Oct. 18, 1972, regulating discharges of pollutants into U.S. waters and setting quality standards for surface waters. Now, 50 years later, Michigan is marking the anniversary of the landmark legislation with a three-week educational webinar series.

“This is a great time to reflect on a historic turning point for environmental protection,” said Liesl Clark, director of the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE), the agency responsible for implementing  the CWA in Michigan.Clark said the Act has been especially impactful in Michigan, which sits in the center of the Great Lakes ecosystem containing one-fifth of the planet’s fresh surface water. “The resolve and foresight that produced the Clean Water Act also drives EGLE’s mission to protect Michigan’s environment and public health by managing our water and other natural resources.”

From 11 a.m.-noon Tuesday, Oct. 4, EGLE invites anyone with an interest in Michigan history and protecting the state’s water resources to virtually attend “50 Years of the Clean Water Act: An Overview of the Clean Water Act and its History and Significance in Michigan.” The program provides a historical perspective on the events that led to the Clean Water Act, an overview of important changes implemented, and what it all meant for Michigan. Online registration is open for the Oct. 4 webinar and the two others in the series:

About the Clean Water Act

The CWA is the primary federal statute regulating protection of the nation’s waters. It developed out of growing public concern in the 1960s and 1970s over substantial pollution entering the nation’s waterways. Over the past half century, it has transformed water quality in lakes, rivers, streams, and oceans across the United States.

The Act significantly amended a 1940s-era water pollution control law and established the basic framework for regulating the discharge of pollutants to lakes, rivers, streams, and wetlands; and for protecting water resources. Since the Act’s implementation and amendments over the years, Michigan and the U.S. have taken significant steps to meet its goals to restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the nation’s waters.

Under the CWA, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has implemented pollution control programs such as setting wastewater standards for industry and developed national water quality criteria recommendations for pollutants in surface waters. The CWA made it unlawful to discharge any pollutant from a point source into navigable waters without a permit.

In Michigan, water quality has significantly improved. The CWA requires the state to submit a biennial Integrated Report on the quality of its water resources to the EPA and U.S. Congress. The 2020 and 2022 reports are available online.

Learn more about the CWA and its use in protecting and restoring water resources nationwide in “50 Years of the Clean Water Act,” a multimedia presentation by the Association of Clean Water Administrators – an independent, nonpartisan, national organization of state, interstate, and territorial water program managers.

Keep up on EGLE events and activities surrounding the CWA’s 50th anniversary at michigan.gov/CWA50.

EGLE announces scrap tire cleanup grants

EGLE announces scrap tire cleanup grants

 
EGLE Main GovD banner
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Sept. 27, 2022
Jeff Johnston, EGLE public information officer, JohnstonJ14@michigan.gov, 517-231-9304
Kirsten Clemens, Scrap Tire Coordinator, EGLE-ScrapTire@Michigan.gov, 517-614-7431

EGLE announces scrap tire cleanup grants

Applications due by Oct. 28 to fund disposal or reuse

The Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE) is pleased to announce the availability of grants that support the cleanup and reuse of scrap tires in Michigan.

When scrap tires are dumped illegally in the environment, they become a fire hazard and a mosquito breeding ground. Through grants, scrap tires can be collected, processed, and used in paving products for roads, manufactured products, and energy production.

The Scrap Tire Cleanup Grant is available for property owners to clean up old or abandoned scrap tire piles. EGLE will give priority to collection sites where tires were accumulated prior to Jan. 1, 1991, as well as collection sites that pose an imminent threat to public health, safety, welfare, or the environment. Local units of government and nonprofit organizations are also eligible for funding for cleanup days and roadside cleanup grants.

Scrap Tire Market Development Grants are available to fund up to 50% of total eligible costs for projects that demonstrate new or increased uses of scrap tires in manufactured products or paving projects. EGLE will prioritize proposals based on the amount of scrap tire material being used in developing the project or product, demonstration of a new use of scrap tire material, and demonstration of a viable market for a proposed product.

To apply for a grant, visit the Scrap Tire website, and select the appropriate link under “Grant Information,” or contact EGLE at EGLE-ScrapTire@Michigan.gov.

EGLE will accept scrap tire grant applications with all supporting documentation received on or before 11:59 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time, Friday, Oct. 28, 2022.

Stay up to date on other EGLE news at Michigan.gov/MIEnvironment.

NoHaz Collection Event: There’s Still Time

NoHaz Collection Event: There’s Still Time

NoHaz Collection EventThere’s Still Time to Safely Dispose of Your Household Hazardous Waste
Register Today for the Last NoHaz Collection Event of 2022
Saturday, Sept 24, 2022 | 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Oakland County Service Center Campus | 1200 N. Telegraph Road, Pontiac
Follow signs once on campus

Register Today at: NoHaz.EventBrite.com

“I’ve attended a few NoHaz events for the past couple years, and I am always so impressed with how smoothly and efficiently the events run. It is so easy to participate and the volunteers/workers at the event are always incredibly nice and friendly. I really value and appreciate these events – thank you for hosting them!”

– NoHaz Collection Event Participant, Pontiac, April 2022

To help accelerate the drop-off process:
Pre-register and pay applicable fees at NoHaz.com (registration opens about three weeks prior to each collection event)
Bring household hazardous waste (HHW) only; no business, institution or contractor waste
Separate HHW in your vehicle into three types:
1. Paint 2. Electronics (unloaded last) 3. All other HHW*
Clearly separate HHW from other items in your vehicle
Bring acceptable HHW** only; liquids must be in leakproof five-gallon containers or smaller
Present your driver’s license or other proof of residency and your registration ticket (either printed or digitally)
Remain in your vehicle
Masks are encouraged when interacting with volunteers
*Chemicals, motor oil, fertilizers, batteries, syringes, etc.
**For a more comprehensive list of acceptable materials, as well as member communities and applicable fees, visit: NoHaz.com

 

Thank you for caring about the environment.
We appreciate your participation!

Questions? Contact wrmd@oakgov.com

NoHaz.com | Oakland County Economic Development | David CoulterAll ways, moving forward

NoHaz Collection Event: There’s Still Time

nohaz, Saturday, July 23, 2022

NoHaz Collection EventDon't Trash Your Hazardous Waste Bring it to a NoHaz Collection Event Near You.

Register Today for the
Next Collection Event

Saturday, July 23, 2022  |  8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Kensington Church  |  4640 S, Lapeer Road, Orion Township
Register Today at: NoHaz.EventBrite.com


Poster Contest Third Place Winner

Together, we can make the world a safer, healthier place. That’s the message of Layla Hall, a fourth grader at Harvey Swanson Elementary School and third place winner of the 2022 NoHaz Poster Contest.  Layla uses her creativity to remind us how we can help protect our world by properly disposing of household hazardous waste (HHW). Do your part to make our planet a safer place for future generations by bringing your HHW to a NoHaz Collection Event near you.


To help accelerate the drop-off process:

  • Pre-register and pay applicable fees at NoHaz.com (registration opens about three weeks prior to each collection event)
  • Bring household hazardous waste (HHW) only; no business, institution or contractor waste
  • Separate HHW in your vehicle into three types:
    1. Paint   2. Electronics   3. All other HHW*
  • Clearly separate HHW from other items in your vehicle
  • Bring acceptable HHW** only; liquids must be in leakproof five-gallon containers or smaller
  • Present your driver’s license or other proof of residency and your registration ticket (either printed or digitally)
  • Remain in your vehicle
  • Masks are encouraged when interacting with volunteers

*Chemicals, motor oil, fertilizers, batteries, syringes, etc.
**For a more comprehensive list of acceptable materials, as well as member communities and applicable fees, visit: NoHaz.com

Thank you for caring about the environment.
We appreciate your participation!


Questions? Contact wrmd@oakgov.com


This email was sent to ilocke@orionontv.org using GovDelivery Communications Cloud on behalf of: Oakland County, Michigan · 1200 North Telegraph Road · Pontiac, MI 48341 · 1-888-350-0900 · Unsubscribe GovDelivery logo
MI Environment features upcoming Great Lakes beach walks

MI Environment features upcoming Great Lakes beach walks

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MI Environment features upcoming Great Lakes beach walks

Journalists: We thought you might be interested in today’s MI Environment story that highlights Footprints in the sand with people in the distance walking along the shoreline.the eight upcoming Great Lakes beach walks in Michigan, hosted by the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. 

The program’s goal is to increase coastal communities’ resilience — the ability to understand and use available resources to respond to, withstand, and recover from adverse situations.

The walks also will provide an opportunity to learn about the Michigan Coastal Management Program’s Pathway to Resilience and information on grant funding.

EGLE partners with Army Corps of Engineers for educational beach walks

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